Saturday, May 23, 2020

Harlem Renaissance Poets Countee Cullen and Georgia...

The Great Migration of African Americans during the XXth century initiated a particular series of poets who chose to express their thoughts through writing. Whats more, what these poets had to say for themselves and collectively had been a sensible topic among groups of black people living in a most racist era. There was a lot published in the newspapers in those times and not everything was poetry. Letters were received from people seeking to flee from the southern parts of America where nothing good had come to them, no jobs, no shaking of hands, but high prices and a lot of discontents. Articles were covering the pages with an emphasis on the number of people who seemed to have all decided at once to settle someplace else. Out of this widespread phenomenon emerged a cultural movement known unto the name of the Harlem Renaissance, quite a romantic entitlement for what represented quite a major step forward in the history of African American culture. Music, visual arts, literature e ncapsulated such a particular style that it created the movement by itself. Countee Cullen is more than just a product poet of the Renaissance, he managed to establish himself as a trademark in this respect. Facts around his birth and early childhood are somewhat of a mystery, little is known about this period in his life. Adopted by Frederick Cullen, a minister and a black activist, Countee remarked himself all through college and university, becoming involved in several academic activities.Show MoreRelatedThe Harlem Renaissance1209 Words   |  5 Pagesï » ¿The Harlem Renaissance represents the rebirth and flowering of African-American culture. Although the Harlem Renaissance was concentrated in the Harlem district of New York City, its legacy reverberated throughout the United States and even abroad, to regions with large numbers of former slaves or blacks needing to construct ethnic identities amid a dominant white culture. The primary means of cultural expression during the Harlem Renaissance were literature and poetry, although visual art, dramaRead MoreThe Harlem Renaissance s Influence And Impact1262 Words   |  6 PagesThe Harlem Renaissance s Influence and Impact The Harlem Renaissance era is known for its rich culture and being the source for many African American breakthrough artists such as Alain Locke,W.E.B DuBois, and Ethel Waters. . Whether it be the diversity of music, drama, art, or literature, it’s surely present during that period of time and still is today. Many questions about this time period include â€Å"How was Harlem life like back then?† â€Å"What is the Harlem Renaissance?†, and â€Å"How did itRead MoreHarlem Renaissance3262 Words   |  14 PagesHarlem Renaissance, a blossoming (c. 1918–37) of African American culture, particularly in the creative arts, and the most influential movement in African American literary history. Embracing literary, musical, theatrical, and visual arts, participants sought to reconceptualize â€Å"the Negro† apart from the white stereotypes that had influenced black peoples’ relationship to their heritage and to each other. They also sought to break free of Victorian moral values and bourgeois shame about aspects ofRead MoreHistory5499 Words   |  22 PagesHARLEM RENAISSANCE by William R. Nash ^ The term ‘‘Harlem Renaissance’’ refers to the efï ¬â€šorescence of African-American cultural production that occurred in New York City in the 1920s and early 1930s. One sometimes sees Harlem Renaissance used interchangeably with ‘‘New Negro Renaissance,’’ a term that includes all African Americans, regardless of their location, who participated in this cultural revolution. Followers of the New Negro dicta, which emphasized blacks’ inclusion in and empowermentRead MoreLangston Hughes Research Paper25309 Words   |  102 PagesHis favorite poet was Paul Laurence Dunbar, who wrote formal poetry, but became famous for poems written in black dialect. Langston also read the Bible. His favorite novels were Harriet Beecher Stowes Uncle Toms Cabin, Mark Twains The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Zane Greys, Riders of the Purple Sage, Harold Bell Wrights The Shepherd of the Hills, Edna Ferbers Cimarron, Gene Stratton Porters Freckles , and Florence L. Barclays The Mistress of Shenstone. Langston admired poet Paul Laurence

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

William Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice - 1375 Words

â€Å"The devil can cite scripture for his purpose, an Evil soul producing holy witness with a smiling cheek.† hose famous words of Shakespeare’s Protagonist Antonio in the Merchant of Venice revolve around a long history of people in power using religious outlines as a basis for legal principle. President Widodo is a leader and a devout Muslim who believes that the death penalty will solve many of the problems of his country. On the 17th of April 2005 a group of Australians who are known as the â€Å"Bali Nine,† foolishly planned to smuggle 8.3kg of heroin into Australia but, were intercepted by the Indonesian Police. They were condemned for their crime and now face the Death Penalty due to the Indonesian laws involving drug trafficking. Such cruel and barbaric laws ensure that life for those found guilty would be either hell in prison or life will be cut short for the perpetrators. Being young and foolish may result in severe consequences but taking away the life of any person for mistakes made is against humanity. The boyish looking Widodo, when first elected as President of Indonesia in 2014 wanted to bring a new and clean style of politics to his country. He implemented severe laws in order to crack down on crime and ensured that the death penalty would be key asset to guaranteeing this. The smiling assassin is icon for the people of Indonesia People like him holding fast to such beliefs only portray what is wrong and do a great injustice to modern society. A personShow MoreRelatedWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice Essay1624 Words   |  7 PagesWilliam Shakespeare s comedy The Merchant of Venice uses contrasting religions to draw out major themes through the ethnic divides that are exemplified. The play expresses the extreme cultural divide between the Jews and Christians through a legal contract between two men. The rivalry between the two men, Shylock and Antonio is clear from the beginning of the play and only intensifies as it continues on. Modern day readers most likely take away a slightly different message from the play than whatRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice1320 Words   |  6 Pagesghetto, and were treated as inferior to the rest of the city. William Shakespeare’s play The Merchant of Venice exhibits the prejudicial attitudes of his era. Antonio, a Christian merchant, m akes a deal with Shylock, a Jewish moneylender. Shylock uses it as an opportunity to exact revenge by demanding a pound of Antonio’s flesh if he does not meet his end of the bargain. By pitting the majority of his characters against Shylock, Shakespeare portrays Shylock in a way that discriminates against all JewsRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice2269 Words   |  10 PagesSamantha Hansen ENG 314 Brother Brugger 12.15.14 The Question of Shylock It is hard to read The Merchant of Venice without finding at least one character to sympathize with. The unforgettable villain Shylock as well as Portia, Shakespeare’s first and one of his most famous heroines are arguably some of this plays most beloved characters. But, is Shylock really the villain? Or is he a victim of circumstance? Shylock’s insistence for a pound of flesh has made him one of literatures most memorableRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice1970 Words   |  8 Pagesthe titles are reflective of the protagonists featured within. For example, the famous titles of Julius Caesar and Hamlet tell the tragedies of those respective characters. However, when it comes to William Shakespeare’s fourteenth play, The Merchant of Venice, it can be argued that Antonio, the merchant, is not who the play is about. In fact, there is not just one character, but instead multiple that fit the description of the protagonist. The main plot, or rather p lots, of the play revolve aroundRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice1315 Words   |  6 PagesIn The Merchant of Venice by William Shakespeare the play is based upon the hierarchy between Christian men and Jewish men. A character by the name of Bassanio borrows money from his friend Antonio, and Antonio borrows the money from Shylock to give to Bassanio. Eventually, Antonio cannot pay the money back because his ships have supposedly sunk. Therefore, he comes close to death because he signed a bond with Shylock stating that Shylock would get a pound of his flesh if the bond was not repaidRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice1532 Words   |  7 Pagesuseless dialogue can make readers skip over what seems like a false beginning to a good story. But think about this: what if those seemingly lengthy, extra, useless words were actually important? For example, the opening 115 lines of William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice are provide minimal support to the story at first glance. In these lines, Antonio and his friends are discussing the dynamics of happiness and sadness in order to find the root of Antonio’s sad mood. This portion of the play givesRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s Merchant Of Venice988 Words   |  4 PagesAs I finished reading Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare, I realized that the struggle of the play gyrates around whether justice is truly served and is morality advocated or manipulated by those in authority. The struggle between the principles of justice have caused many readers to question the interaction between the definition of morality and justice. The bond that causes readers to take a closer look throughout the play originates from Shylock’s desire for vengeance and Antonio’s desireRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice1532 Words   |  7 Pagesfundamentalist Americans. The ills of money-lending from the Eastern perspective have been fodder for Western literature for centuries, replete with illustrations that mirror the differences and similarities in East-West cultural norms. In William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice, money-lending has gone awry. In Act I, Scene iii, the Italian Antonio seeks to borrow 3,000 ducats from the Jewish Shylock, and Shylock intends to charge him interest, which is against Jewish economic-religious principles (BateRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice Essay1275 Words   |  6 PagesShakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice is so alike to our financially afflicted world. The rules of law and commerce are subject to deceptive manipulation, fear of the other overwhelms respect for a common humanity, duplicity is the norm, sexuality is a vehicle for ambition, and money drives and wraps almost every action. It is a classic tale that includes important details of the financial crisis in the Unit ed States during 2007-2009. Shakespeare’s Venice, like the New York of his time - and theRead MoreWilliam Shakespeare s The Merchant Of Venice2059 Words   |  9 Pagesin The Merchant of Venice resembles a folktale known as â€Å"A Pound of Flesh† (325). Artese supports his supposition with background context and parallels between the two story lines. Literary versions of the pound of flesh story circulated during the sixteenth century and were collected since the nineteenth century because of the plot’s longevity and populairity Shakespeare would have been familiar with pound of flesh stories (326). Human commodification is a central issue in both The Merchant of Venice

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence Free Essays

The Effectiveness of using Cooperative Learning in Enhancing Reading Comprehension for English for Communication II students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. Chapter 2: Literature Review 1. John Myers (Cooperative Learning Vol 11 #4 July 1991) points out that the dictionary definitions of â€Å"collaboration†, derived from its Latin root, focus on the process of working together; the root word for â€Å"cooperation† stresses the product of such work. We will write a custom essay sample on Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence or any similar topic only for you Order Now 2. According to Ted Panitz (1996), he summarize from Johnson, Johnson Smith (1991) the six principles of their definition of a new paradigm of teaching and define cooperation is a structure that was designed to help and guide the specific of product or aims through people that working together in a group. 3. According to Skinners, et. al (2001), cooperative learning is also one of approach under The Communicative Approach where it involves a group of learners been instructed by one teacher when they are working together to complete the task instead of competitively working on it. . Weidner (2003,p. 29) states that cooperative learning is a special form of group teaching which accentuates and structures social processes in learning and makes them a subject of discussion. 5. â€Å" Cooperative learning is the instructional use of small groups os that students work together to maximize their own and other’s learning† (Johnson, Johnson Holubec, 1998,p. 15) 6. Robert Slavin ( 1987), suggested that cooperative learning occurs when instructional methods enable students to work and learn in small heterogeneous – ability groups. When this happens, cooperative learning is able to lead students into the social power of learning (Zemelman, Baniel Hyde, 1993) 7. Roger T. and David W. Johnson (1994), says that even though these three interaction patterns are not equally effective in helping students learn concepts and skills, it is important that students learn to interact effectively in each of these ways. Students will face situations in which all three interaction patterns are operating and they will need to be able to be effective in each. They also should be able to select the appropriate interaction pattern suited to the situation. An interpersonal, competitive situation is characterized by negative goal interdependence where, when one person wins, the others lose. 8. Borchmann Kirchmann (2006), found that there 5 basic elements in cooperative learning which is interpersonal and small group skills, face to face interaction, individual and group accountability, positive interdependence and group processing. 9. Cowie and Rudduck, (1988, p. 0), state that cooperative learning offers a view of learning which is socially based. 10. Artzt and Newman(1990), define that cooperative learning is an activity involving a small group of learning who work together as a team to complete a task or accomplish a common goal. 11. Davidson (1990) says that cooperative learning is a task of group discussion and resolution (if possible) requiring face to face interaction, an atmosphere of cooperation and mutual helpfulness and individual accountability. 12. Spencer, Kegan (1990), provided as definition of collaborative learning by looking at general structures which can be applied to any situation. He defines collaborative learning as the structured approach to collaborative learning which is based on the creation, analysis and systematic application of structures or content- free ways of organizing social interaction in the classroom. 13. Goodsell, Maher and Tinto (1992) describe cooperative learning as a working in groups of two or more mutually searching for understanding, solutions or meanings or creating a product. 4. O’Donnell (2002) is that this cooperative method enhances social interaction that is important for learning because higher mental functions, such as reasoning, comprehension and critical thinking, originate in social interactions and are then internalized by individuals. 15. From Collins Online Dictionary 10th Edition, reading comprehension is a text that students use to help them improve their reading skills b y reading and answering questions relating to the text. Sometimes, used as a test or examination of reading skills. A reading comprehension can be in the students own or another language. 16. According to Snow, Catherine E (2002), in her report entitled ‘Reading For Understanding; Towards an RD Program in Reading Comprehension†, defines reading comprehension as the â€Å"process simultaneously extracting and constructing meaning through interaction and involvement with written language†. 17. Aarnoutse, Van den Bos,. Brand-Gruwel, 1998; Jenkins et al. , (2003), believe that vocabulary knowledge, fluency, word recognition, and listening comprehension are necessary skills for reading comprehension. 18. s a process that requires how to decode through the development of an extensive repertoire of sight words, learning the meanings of vocabulary words encountered in the texts, and learning how to abstract meaning from text. It represents how well readers understand literal comprehension which concentrates on explicit meaning and inferential comprehension which concentrates on implicit meaning in the reading text. 19. Pressley (2000), states that the development of comprehension skills is a long term developmental process which depends on language and text experiences from early stage of life. Learning how to decode and learning how to abstract the meanings of vocabulary words are commonly encountered in texts. 20. Tahir, (1988, p. 24), â€Å"Reading comprehension involves visual mechanical skills of recognition, remembering of meaning of words, integrating grammatical and semantic clues and relating to the reader’s own general knowledge and the knowledge of the subject being read†. 21. Daniel E. Himes (2007), in his article entitled â€Å"How to Improve Reading Comprehension†, he supports that cooperative learning is one of the method to improve reading comprehension. 2. Erly Wahyuni (2006) in his journal article entitled â€Å"The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Technique in Increasing the Students’ Comprehension of Literary Texts† said that the learners’ responses to the cooperative learning in literary text was good and interesting as they were able to discuss the literary text together. 23. Kassim Shaaban (2007,) from hi s article â€Å"An Initial Study of the Effects of Cooperative Learning on Reading Comprehension, Vocabulary Acquisition, and Motivation to Read† that cooperative learning improves learners’ motivation to read. How to cite Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence, Essays Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence Free Essays The Effectiveness of using Cooperative Learning in Enhancing Reading Comprehension for English for Communication II students in Universiti Utara Malaysia. Chapter 2: Literature Review 1. John Myers (Cooperative Learning Vol 11 #4 July 1991) points out that the dictionary definitions of â€Å"collaboration†, derived from its Latin root, focus on the process of working together; the root word for â€Å"cooperation† stresses the product of such work. We will write a custom essay sample on Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence or any similar topic only for you Order Now 2. According to Ted Panitz (1996), he summarize from Johnson, Johnson Smith (1991) the six principles of their definition of a new paradigm of teaching and define cooperation is a structure that was designed to help and guide the specific of product or aims through people that working together in a group. 3. According to Skinners, et. al (2001), cooperative learning is also one of approach under The Communicative Approach where it involves a group of learners been instructed by one teacher when they are working together to complete the task instead of competitively working on it. . Weidner (2003,p. 29) states that cooperative learning is a special form of group teaching which accentuates and structures social processes in learning and makes them a subject of discussion. 5. â€Å" Cooperative learning is the instructional use of small groups os that students work together to maximize their own and other’s learning† (Johnson, Johnson Holubec, 1998,p. 15) 6. Robert Slavin ( 1987), suggested that cooperative learning occurs when instructional methods enable students to work and learn in small heterogeneous – ability groups. When this happens, cooperative learning is able to lead students into the social power of learning (Zemelman, Baniel Hyde, 1993) 7. Roger T. and David W. Johnson (1994), says that even though these three interaction patterns are not equally effective in helping students learn concepts and skills, it is important that students learn to interact effectively in each of these ways. Students will face situations in which all three interaction patterns are operating and they will need to be able to be effective in each. They also should be able to select the appropriate interaction pattern suited to the situation. An interpersonal, competitive situation is characterized by negative goal interdependence where, when one person wins, the others lose. 8. Borchmann Kirchmann (2006), found that there 5 basic elements in cooperative learning which is interpersonal and small group skills, face to face interaction, individual and group accountability, positive interdependence and group processing. 9. Cowie and Rudduck, (1988, p. 0), state that cooperative learning offers a view of learning which is socially based. 10. Artzt and Newman(1990), define that cooperative learning is an activity involving a small group of learning who work together as a team to complete a task or accomplish a common goal. 11. Davidson (1990) says that cooperative learning is a task of group discussion and resolution (if possible) requiring face to face interaction, an atmosphere of cooperation and mutual helpfulness and individual accountability. 12. Spencer, Kegan (1990), provided as definition of collaborative learning by looking at general structures which can be applied to any situation. He defines collaborative learning as the structured approach to collaborative learning which is based on the creation, analysis and systematic application of structures or content- free ways of organizing social interaction in the classroom. 13. Goodsell, Maher and Tinto (1992) describe cooperative learning as a working in groups of two or more mutually searching for understanding, solutions or meanings or creating a product. 4. O’Donnell (2002) is that this cooperative method enhances social interaction that is important for learning because higher mental functions, such as reasoning, comprehension and critical thinking, originate in social interactions and are then internalized by individuals. 15. From Collins Online Dictionary 10th Edition, reading comprehension is a text that students use to help them improve their reading skills b y reading and answering questions relating to the text. Sometimes, used as a test or examination of reading skills. A reading comprehension can be in the students own or another language. 16. According to Snow, Catherine E (2002), in her report entitled ‘Reading For Understanding; Towards an RD Program in Reading Comprehension†, defines reading comprehension as the â€Å"process simultaneously extracting and constructing meaning through interaction and involvement with written language†. 17. Aarnoutse, Van den Bos,. Brand-Gruwel, 1998; Jenkins et al. , (2003), believe that vocabulary knowledge, fluency, word recognition, and listening comprehension are necessary skills for reading comprehension. 18. s a process that requires how to decode through the development of an extensive repertoire of sight words, learning the meanings of vocabulary words encountered in the texts, and learning how to abstract meaning from text. It represents how well readers understand literal comprehension which concentrates on explicit meaning and inferential comprehension which concentrates on implicit meaning in the reading text. 19. Pressley (2000), states that the development of comprehension skills is a long term developmental process which depends on language and text experiences from early stage of life. Learning how to decode and learning how to abstract the meanings of vocabulary words are commonly encountered in texts. 20. Tahir, (1988, p. 24), â€Å"Reading comprehension involves visual mechanical skills of recognition, remembering of meaning of words, integrating grammatical and semantic clues and relating to the reader’s own general knowledge and the knowledge of the subject being read†. 21. Daniel E. Himes (2007), in his article entitled â€Å"How to Improve Reading Comprehension†, he supports that cooperative learning is one of the method to improve reading comprehension. 2. Erly Wahyuni (2006) in his journal article entitled â€Å"The Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning Technique in Increasing the Students’ Comprehension of Literary Texts† said that the learners’ responses to the cooperative learning in literary text was good and interesting as they were able to discuss the literary text together. 23. Kassim Shaaban (2007,) from hi s article â€Å"An Initial Study of the Effects of Cooperative Learning on Reading Comprehension, Vocabulary Acquisition, and Motivation to Read† that cooperative learning improves learners’ motivation to read. How to cite Cooperative Learning for Positive Interdependence, Essay examples

Saturday, May 2, 2020

Cybercrime and Digital Forensics Surveillance †MyAssignmenthelp.com

Question: Discuss about the Cybercrime and Digital Forensics Surveillance. Answer: Introduction: After reviewing the Symantec Cybercrime Report, I was shocked to find out that Australia is present in the list of top ten countries that are severely affected by cyber-attacks. After researching a bit further, I realized that the number of cyber-attacks in Australia has doubled since last year. In 2016, more than 60% of the businesses in Australia has faced a cyber-vulnerability on a monthly basis (Holt, Bossler Seigfried-Spellar, 2015). I already had a vague idea about cybercrime that it was usually conducted through computers for illicit purposes such as child pornography, trafficking, stealing of intellectual property and banking fraud. To understand about the cybercrimes, I had to understand why the attacks were so prevalent nowadays. The first reason I found out was that the increasing complexity of the computer systems was the main reason for the increasing vulnerability. Recently, researchers found a vulnerability which utilized a complex system of processors named speculative execution to extract user data. The second reason was related to higher consumer expectations. Next, I studied some research articles to understand the types of exploits. A code which is programmable and forces a computer to behave in an unexpected way is known as Virus. A Worm is a malicious program that attaches itself in a computers memory to duplicate itself. A Trojan horse is a hidden malicious code inside a harmless program that activates itself during a specific event. DDoS attacks causes a computer or a server to flood the targeted system with continuous requests for data and tasks (Yar, 2013). Other lesser known cyber threats are spams, rootkits and phishing. One particular threat called botnets caught my attention. Botnets are used to control a number of computers by the attacker from a remote location without the knowledge of the user. The affected computers are used to distribute malicious codes. Due to these wide number of threats, the Spam Act was passed by the ACMA or Australian Communications and Media Authority in 2003 which prevented users from sending unauthorized electronic messages (Loader Thomas, 2013). Mobile text messages, instant messaging as well as emails were included in the Act and those who went against the Act were penalized heavily. The classification of perpetrators and their motives also interested me. I was only aware of hackers and cyber terrorists but the other classifications such as crackers, malicious insiders, industrial spies and hacktivists forced me to understand the motive behind their attacks in details (Kirwan Power, 2013). Next, I studied some real life cybercrime attacks and assessed their mitigation strategies. Establishing a security policy is mandatory for every organization. According to me, the main areas of concern should be email attachment and wireless devices I found out that a basic corporate firewall will definitely limit network access in an organization preventing users from downloading an exploit accidentally (Yar, 2013). Intrusion detection system or IDS will help the administrator to monitor the system activities and notify him or her when a network traffic attempts to get around the security measures. For a normal citizen like me, a basic antivirus or basic safeguard (like deleting login passwords after the work is done) can prevent these cyber threats from implementing malicious codes in the system. The AFP (Australian Federal Police) should check whether these policies and strategies are followed by every organization in the state. Computer forensics need to be properly developed so that perpetrators can be punished in the court of law. References Holt, T. J., Bossler, A. M., Seigfried-Spellar, K. C. (2015).Cybercrime and digital forensics: An introduction. Routledge. Kirwan, G., Power, A. (2013).Cybercrime: The psychology of online offenders. Cambridge University Press. Loader, B. D., Thomas, D. (Eds.). (2013).Cybercrime: Security and surveillance in the information age. Routledge. Yar, M. (2013).Cybercrime and society. Sage.

Monday, March 23, 2020

Taja Zenna Affirmative Action Essay Example For Students

Taja Zenna Affirmative Action Essay The debate over affirmative action is a debate over the conflict of rights. This conflict of rights makes a clear-cut ruling or decision on the subject almost unattainable. However, there can be arguments made both for and against affirmative action. Supporters of affirmative action claim that racism and sexism can only be overcome by taking race and sex into account in finding a solution. They think that giving everyone equal rights is not enough to overcome the burden. Therefore, for everyone to be truly equal some people must be given certain benefits. So in hiring, acceptance to college, and other related things, businesses or colleges must hire or accept applicants on the basis of sex and race. In doing so they should give preference to blacks, women, and other minorities. This preference in hiring and accepting to level out the playing field is often called equality of results. Lately, affirmative action has taken the role of trying to diversify the environment of jobs and colleges. On the other hand, you have people who do not believe in or support the idea of affirmative action. They believe in the equality of opportunity rather than the equality of results. Equality of opportunity means that everyone should have the same rights and opportunities from the beginning, and what the individual does with those rights is up to them. People that do not agree with affirmative action often argue that if it is wrong to take away rights on the basis of race or sex, then it would also be wrong to give extra rights or preference to someone on the basis of their race or sex. This reverse discrimination seems to go against the principle it was founded on. We will write a custom essay on Taja Zenna Affirmative Action specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Naturally, the Supreme Court has gotten involved with this controversial issue. Out of the twelve major Supreme Court cases that have been heard, half have been upheld and half have been overturned. The major issue in the courts has been whether or not a quota system set up by the government would be legal. Most who support affirmative action think a quota system would be necessary, and conversely those who do not support affirmative action would not support a quota system. There have been mixed rulings in the Supreme Court so it is still hard to say whose side is right. In 1978, 1989, and 1993 the Supreme Court ruled against a quota system in the workplace. However, in 1980 and 1990 the court upheld a system of quotas in the workplace. So even the Supreme Court itself cannot decide which stand to take on quotas and affirmative action. There does seem to be some pattern to their rulings. If any quota system is created it will be strictly scrutinized. In deciding whether the quota system in each case is legal, they must first show that the system is needed and that there was discrimination. So where does that leave those who do and do not support affirmative action? It looks like each case is being decided on a situational basis and that there is little or no precedence used in new cases. So it is still The debate over affirmative action is a debate over the conflict of rights. This conflict of rights makes a clear-cut ruling or decision on the subject almost unattainable. However, there can be arguments made both for and against affirmative action. Supporters of affirmative action claim that racism and sexism can only be overcome by taking race and sex into account in finding a solution. They think that giving everyone equal rights is not enough to overcome the burden. Therefore, for everyone to be truly equal some people must be given certain benefits. So in hiring, acceptance to college, and other related things, businesses or colleges must hire or accept applicants on the basis of sex and race. In doing so they should give preference to blacks, women, and other minorities. This preference in hiring and accepting to level out the playing field is often called equality of results. Lately, affirmative action has taken the role of trying to diversify the environment of jobs and colleges. On the other hand, you have people who do not believe in or support the idea of affirmative action. They believe in the equality of opportunity rather than the equality of results. Equality of opportunity means that everyone should have the same rights and opportunities from the beginning, and what the individual does with those rights is up to them. People that do not agree with affirmative action often argue that if it is wrong to take away rights on the basis of race or sex, then it would also be wrong to give extra rights or preference to someone on the basis of their race or sex. This reverse discrimination seems to go against the principle it was founded on. .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .postImageUrl , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:hover , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:visited , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:active { border:0!important; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:active , .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u97c13aa5a31d24b8644b684f0e7108fe:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: The Symbolism of Religion and Comparison Argumentative EssayNaturally, the Supreme Court has gotten involved with this controversial issue. Out of the twelve major Supreme Court cases that have been heard, half have been upheld and half have been overturned. The major issue in the courts has been whether or not a quota system set up by the government would be legal. Most who support affirmative action think a quota system would be necessary, and conversely those who do not support affirmative action would not support a quota system. There have been mixed rulings in the Supreme Court so it is still hard to say whose side is right. In 1978, 1989, and 1993 the Supreme Court r uled against a quota system in the workplace. However, in 1980 and 1990 the court upheld a system of quotas in the workplace. So even the Supreme Court itself cannot decide which stand to take on quotas and affirmative action. There does seem to be some pattern to their rulings. If any quota system is created it will be strictly scrutinized. In deciding whether the quota system in each case is legal, they must first show that the system is needed and that there was discrimination. So where does that leave those who do and do not support affirmative action? It looks like each case is being decided on a situational basis and that there is little or no precedence used in new cases. So it is still The debate over affirmative action is a debate over the conflict of rights. This conflict of rights makes a clear-cut ruling or decision on the subject almost unattainable. However, there can be arguments made both for and against affirmative action. Supporters of affirmative action claim that racism and sexism can only be overcome by taking race and sex into account in finding a solution. They think that giving everyone equal rights is not enough to overcome the burden. Therefore, for everyone to be truly equal some people must be given certain benefits. So in hiring, acceptance to college, and other related things, businesses or colleges must hire or accept applicants on the basis of sex and race. In doing so they should give preference to blacks, women, and other minorities. This preference in hiring and accepting to level out the playing field is often called equality of results. Lately, affirmative action has taken the role of trying to diversify the environment of jobs and colleges. On the other hand, you have people who do not believe in or support the idea of affirmative action. They believe in the equality of opportunity rather than the equality of results. Equality of opportunity means that everyone should have the same rights and opportunities from the beginning, and what the individual does with those rights is up to them. People that do not agree with affirmative action often argue that if it is wrong to take away rights on the basis of race or sex, then it would also be wrong to give extra rights or preference to someone on the basis of their race or sex. This reverse discrimination seems to go against the principle it was founded on. Naturally, the Supreme Court has gotten involved with this controversial issue. Out of the twelve major Supreme Court cases that have been heard, half have been upheld and half have been overturned. The major issue in the courts has been whether or not a quota system set up by the government would be legal. Most who support affirmative action think a quota system would be necessary, and conversely those who do not support affirmative action would not support a quota system. There have been mixed rulings in the Supreme Court so it is still hard to say whose side is right. In 1978, 1989, and 1993 the Supreme Court ruled against a quota system in the workplace. However, in 1980 and 1990 the court upheld a system of quotas in the workplace. So even the Supreme Court itself cannot decide which stand to take on quotas and affirmative action. .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .postImageUrl , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:hover , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:visited , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:active { border:0!important; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:active , .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u44aee3c8f9cd83ee137d10ef5f9aa73a:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Castles EssayThere does seem to be some pattern to their rulings. If any quota system is created it will be strictly scrutinized. In deciding whether the quota system in each case is legal, they must first show that the system is needed and that there was discrimination. So where does that leave those who do and do not support affirmative action? It looks like each case is being decided on a situational basis and that there is little or no precedence used in new cases. Words/ Pages : 1,631 / 24

Friday, March 6, 2020

Hamlet Study Guide

Hamlet Study Guide The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is one of William Shakespeare’s best-known works and one of the most widely-read plays in the English language. Estimated to have been written between 1599 and 1602, Hamlet was one of Shakespeare’s most popular plays at the time of its release, and has remained hugely influential since its creation. Fast Facts: Hamlet Full Title: The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of DenmarkAuthor: William ShakespeareYear Published: Between 1599 and 1602Genre: TragedyType of Work: PlayOriginal Language: EnglishThemes: Appearance vs. Reality; Revenge and Action vs. Inaction; Death, Guilt, and the AfterlifeMajor Characters: Hamlet, Claudius, Polonius, Ophelia, Laertes, Gertrude, Fortinbras, Horatio, The Ghost, Rosencrantz GuildensternFun Fact: Shakespeare’s son, who died at age 11, was named Hamnet; he may have been an inspiration for the tragic character Hamlet. Plot Summary Hamlet is the story of the events that take place after the king of Denmark is found dead. His son, Hamlet, is visited by the kings ghost, who tells him that Hamlet’s uncle Claudius was the murderer. Hamlet resolves to kill Claudius and avenge his fathers death, but he struggles with the morality of his decision and finds himself unable to act. To fool Claudius into thinking he knows nothing about the murder, Hamlet pretends to be insane; however, Hamlet’s actual mental state becomes less and less certain throughout the play. Meanwhile, when Claudius begins to realize Hamlet knows more than he lets on, he plots to kill him. Hamlet, though, is smart; much of the play depicts his brilliant wordplay and cunning outmaneuvers of the king’s courtiers- until, of course, the play’s tragic ending, which sees most of the royal family killed. Major Characters Hamlet. The protagonist of the story, Hamlet is the prince of Denmark and the son of the murdered king. Possessing a melancholy and depressive disposition, he struggles throughout the play with his inability to act on his desire for revenge. Claudius. The current king of Denmark and the brother of the king, Hamlets late father. Claudius murdered the former king and married his wife Gertrude, stealing Hamlet’s right to succeed his father. Polonius. The father of Ophelia and Laertes and advisor to the king. Obsequious, pedantic, and scheming, Polonius is killed by Hamlet. Ophelia. Hamlet’s love interest and Polonius’s daughter. She aims to please her father and is deeply troubled by Hamlet’s madness, but goes mad herself by the end of the play. Laertes. Polonius’s son. He is a man of action, in direct contrast to Hamlet, and is ready to take his revenge as soon as he discovers Hamlet’s hand in the destruction of his father and sister. Gertrude. The queen of Denmark, Hamlet’s mother, and Claudius’s wife. She was married to the old king, but was unfaithful to him with Claudius. Fortinbras. The prince of Norway, who eventually becomes king of Denmark after Hamlets death. Horatio. Hamlet’s best friend from university, who serves as a foil to Hamlet. The Ghost. Hamlet’s dead father, the former king of Denmark. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Hamlet’s childhood friends, whom Hamlet outwits at every turn. Major Themes Appearance vs. Reality. Is the ghost really Hamlet’s dead father? Is Claudius lying? Hamlet must continually grapple with his inability to trust his own interpretation of events, which keeps him in a state of inaction. Death, Guilt, and the Afterlife. Hamlet frequently wonders about the mystery of death. Tied to these thoughts is always the question of guilt, and whether or not his soul- or the soul of another, like Claudius- will wind up in heaven or hell. Revenge and Action vs. Inaction. Although the play is about revenge, Hamlet continually delays the act. Connected to this theme is the question of the afterlife, doubts about which seem to stay Hamlet’s hand. Literary Style Hamlet has had remarkable literary significance from its first performance, which is estimated to have taken place between 1599 and 1602, influencing writers as varied as John Milton, Johann Wilhelm von Goethe, George Eliot, and David Foster Wallace.  It is a tragedy, a genre with roots in classical Greek theatre; however, Shakespeare ignores Aristotle’s injunction for a play to focus primarily on action, not character. Instead, the play follows the twists and turns of Hamlet’s moral struggle much more through soliloquies than plot. The play was written during the reign of Elizabeth I. There are numerous early versions of the play still in existence; each, however, has different lines, so it is the job of the editor to decide which version to publish, and accounts for the many explanatory notes in editions of Shakespeare. About the Author William Shakespeare is arguably the highest-regarded writer in the English language. Although his exact date of birth is unknown, he was baptized in Stratford-Upon-Avon in 1564 and married Anne Hathaway at age 18. Sometime between the ages of 20 and 30, Shakespeare moved to London to start his career in theatre. He worked as an actor and a writer, as well as a part-time owner of the theatre troupe the Lord Chamberlain’s Men, later known as the King’s Men. Since little information about commoners was retained at the time, not much is known about Shakespeare, leading to ongoing questions about his life, his inspiration, and the authorship of his plays.

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey Brand Project Research Paper

Jack Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey Brand Project - Research Paper Example Taking account of the possible challenges that may befall an entrant company in a new market, this paper will propose plan that will enable Brown Forman Corporation to make stylistic entrance into the Brazilian market using their Jack Daniel’s Whiskey. The paper will also propose and rationalize practical staffing policy that will be used to ensure appropriate staffing methods for grading the top-level managers. Introduction It is never an easy move for foreign alcohol manufacturing company to make successful entrance into Brazilian economy. In order to make successful venture in the Brazilian economy by alcohol manufacturing company requires critical and thoughtful scrutiny and steps. This is because most Brazilian civilians start consuming alcohol at very tender ages. Another reason insightful scrutiny before venturing into Brazilian alcohol industry is due to the fact Brazilian legislation to prohibit sales of alcohol to young members of the society. In addition, Brazilian legislation forbids sales of alcohol to already drunk members of the society. From the above three observation on the Brazilian legislation with regard to alcohol, it is clearly evident that great challenges couple with decision making on the appropriate plans to be adopted by Brown Forman Corporation in introducing Jack Daniel’s Whiskey in Brazil. Brown Forman Corporation should employ export technique in introducing Jack Daniel’s alcohol brand into the Brazilian market. In its first attempt to sell the alcohol brand into the Brazilian market, Brown Forman Corporation should adopt the indirect exporting strategies that involve dealing with independent intermediaries. Adopting indirect export method will relieve Brown Forman Corporation the cost that could be incurred constructing or establishing export base in Brazil. The method of indirect export will be a contemporary strategy employed familiarizes Jack Daniel’s Whiskey of the Brown Forman Corporation with th e alcohol consumers in the Brazilian economy (Caragin & Balu, 2008). Export method of entering into a market will enable Brown Forman Corporation to perform market test on Jack Daniel’s Whisky before resorting to establishing stable market. Furthermore, employing export method by Brown Forman Corporation in selling Jack Daniel’s Whiskey in Brazil, will enable the company enjoy economies of scale due to the use of existing facilities in the Brazilian economy. Export system of entering Brazilian alcohol market will facilitate the speed at which Brown Forman Corporation get public recognition of the of its Jack Daniel’s Whisky brand. Bearing in mind the stringent alcoholic laws operated in Brazilian economy, export technique of entering Brazilian economy will ensure direct sale of the Jack Daniel’s Whiskey to the respective consumers without breaching the laws by selling to the underage consumers of alcohol. This method of sales will raise the trust of gover nment on the loyalty of Brown Forman Corporation thereby allowing easy entrance of the company into the Brazilian market. Furthermore, entering into the Brazilian market by export method will enable Brown Forman Corporation an opportunity to exercise total control of prices and profits by vexing participation of intermediaries. Adoption of export entrant method into the Brazilian economy by the Brown Forman Corporation will enable the company exercise maximum utilization of the domestic production plant and resources